Why I chose to study my degree

With so many options out there, it can be a little daunting when trying to decide which degree to take on. From philosophy to mechanical engineering, or even baking technology management or puppetry (yes, those are actual degrees!), there’s a multitude of possibilities that can ‘wow’ you about almost anything you might wish to learn more about. If I could impart just one piece of advice though, it would be to choose to study something that you’re truly passionate about. Of course there are other considerations (such as employment prospects and potential salary post-degree), but if you consider all of that and ensure that your chosen degree aligns with something you’re passionate about, you really can’t go wrong.

Read the full article here: http://www.usq.edu.au/SocialHub/study-work/2015/04/jodie-why-i-chose-my-degree

The break-time options

Ah! Mid-semester break… don’t you just love it? I know that I do. Two weeks of holidays when there are no lectures to attend! It would be so easy to just sit back, put my feet up and relax. After all, a little bit of rest and relaxation is good for the brain! I keep telling myself that I deserve a well-earned break and I have even convinced myself that it will lead to copious amounts of inspiration that will help me with my studies in the second-half of the semester.

Read the full article here: http://www.usq.edu.au/SocialHub/study-tips/2015/03/lisa-break-time-again

How to overcome a workplace that doesn’t support study

It can be hard enough keeping up with your coursework, let alone trying to juggle work as well. But what do you do if your workplace doesn’t support your study? You may not be able to change the situation completely, but chances are that there’s a couple of things you can do to make life a little bit easier, and that’s what this blog post is all about.

Read the full article here: http://social.usq.edu.au/study-work/2015/03/jodie-support-study

Building B? More like building A+! Our new Springfield building

So, the new building (Building B) at Springfield Campus is open for business, and, of course, it’s pretty cool. It’s a pretty big occasion that a lot of us have been looking forward to and I’d like to tell you a little bit about it.

This is what it looked like in January last year:

So perhaps, that isn’t all that impressive. However, get ready for the after shot…

This is what it looks like now!

It’s pretty sweet and I plan to make the most of it during my last year of study.

Read the full article here: http://social.usq.edu.au/uni-lifestyle/2015/03/nick-new-springfield-bldg

Singin’ the back to study blues again?

Ah yes! The post-holiday back to study blues. I am coming to know this song well, because at this time of year I sing it loud. For the last couple of months I have socialised, enjoyed leisure activities and relaxed to my hearts delight, but the holiday fun is all but gone… it’s now just a fading memory and we all have to step back into study mode reality!

Read the full article here: http://www.usq.edu.au/SocialHub/study-tips/2015/03/lisa-back-to-study-blues#sthash.dR74G0Ti.dpuf

New year, new resolutions?!

I have to keep reminding myself that it’s already 2015 and that Semester 1 has arrived. If all goes to plan, I’ll be graduating from my teaching degree at the end of this semester, so I have been pretty focused this week on planning for success.

I’ve decided to keep myself on track by making resolutions focused on areas such as study, health, family and travel. As all areas of my life affect my study in some way, it made sense that I would need resolutions (or ‘goals for improvement’ as I prefer to call them) in multiple areas for maximum effect. I hope that this blog post will help you to join me in making resolutions that will make a genuine difference.

Read the full article here: http://social.usq.edu.au/study-tips/2015/02/jodie-new-year-resolutions

Doc, we’ve got to go back!

As I’m sure some of you are aware, 2015 is the year that Marty McFly arrives in Hill Valley. Not only am I eagerly excited about his entry, I am also excited for the fashion that we are expected to be wearing in October this year.

Okay… so yeah, not great. However, if we get rid of the man-bun, how many of us will really be disappointed?

Read the full article here: http://social.usq.edu.au/study-tips/2015/03/nick-we-have-to-go-back

My final blog: student travel and uni holidays

Hello guys! It’s Jose again, reporting to you live from a little island off of our beautiful home country. That’s right, I snuck out to do a little more travelling. Oops. Oh well, let’s hope you guys are too.

I have one final blog post to write, so will make the most of this opportunity to share some quick final tips to help enjoy your final weeks of university holidays.

jose1

LUGGAGE SPACE
Do NOT bring too many of your study books on your holidays. It is good to bring some, however, I have lost quite a few and they are not cheap to replace.

GETTING YOUR UNI BOOKS
If you decide to extend your holiday, ensure you find a safe avenue to get your books shipped out to you. Orchestrating and tracking international shipping is hard at the best of times. Try and find a friend or relative to bring them over. Or, get in touch with your SRO or the USQ library to discuss ways you can access your course materials from overseas.

MONKEY WAITERS
Do not be afraid to dive in and experience local restaurants. As long as you don’t see your food fall on the floor and you’re not being served by a monkey, you will be perfectly fine. Side note: I have been served by a monkey before. Not as fun as it sounds. If your waiter is a monkey, smile, wave and whatever you do, do not eat the food.

TRAVEL & TECHNOLOGY
Allow technology to help you, but be careful not to allow it to consume your holiday. Don’t be one of those travellers who are more focused on photographing the perfect Facebook display picture than enjoying the view.

However, there is an app that I recently discovered that I would highly suggest downloading before you venture out to explore new lands. It is called AroundAbout (@aroundaboutapp).

This travel app solves a problem that has troubled travellers for generations: too much to see and not enough time, by economising your time and showing you a plethora of options available in your area.

jose2

Not sure where to eat? AroundAbout It! Need a new activity? AroundAbout it! Fancy a cocktail or good cup of coffee? AroundAbout it!

It is so simple that anyone, even a monkey waiter, could use it to SEE and DO MORE on their holidays when time is limited. If there is one thing that I have learned in 10 years on the road, it is that TIME is the most valuable of commodities.

DO IT
Travel for as long as you can. Travel has been and always will be the greatest of motivators to show you what you truly want. It also inspires you to see things differently and you will learn a lot, and then you’ll be able to bring this new found knowledge to your university studies!

With that my friends, I bid you farewell and for your own sake, go, enjoy your time and do NOT waste a second of it.

Au Revoir

José R. Bishop
(ON STRANGER SHORES http://www.onstrangershores.com)

Connect with AroundAbout
http://www.aroundaboutapp.com
http://www.facebook.com/aroundaboutapp
http://www.twitter.com/aroundaboutapp
http://www.instagram.com/aroundaboutapp

The slippery slope of mummy self-doubt

Making the decision to study at university was initially easy and very exciting, but then I came to realise that I may have less time to spend with my family because of the amount of time that was required to succeed at uni. Before long, it became apparent that there were many obstacles to overcome and by far the biggest of these were the ‘guilt’ and the ‘self-doubt’ hurdles. Like so many other uni students, I have been a mother 24/7 for many years. I have been busy taking my children to school, picking them up, taking them to after-school activities and, of course, the obligatory after-school sports that they love so much.

I don’t have any regrets about balancing study with family life, but I struggled with the feeling of guilt. Before I started studying, I wondered for months whether I should devote the next three years of my life to something that I want. What would happen to all those little things at home? You know, the everyday tasks that need to be completed, like the ironing, cleaning, washing (including the dog), paying the bills and, of course, the cooking.

slippery slope of mummy self doubtEven while the guilt raged inside me, deep down I knew that I did deserve to study because it has been my lifelong dream. I realised that all those house chores will still be there when I finish studying–it is not going anywhere–and in the grand scheme of things…It doesn’t matter! As for that lost family time… My family will always be family. They love and support me in my adventures and, in the long run, completing a degree will benefit my family. With these considerations in mind, I convinced myself that with a lot of careful time management skills I would be able to spend quality time with my family as well as studying.

The next step was to overcome the self-doubt that was eating me up inside. The questions I found myself asking included:

  • Can I do it (the hard work)
  • Will I be able to do it (for three years) and
  • Can I succeed?

I have found that the best way to deal with these questions is to find what motivates me. Over the last two years of studying my degree, my motivation has come in many forms:

  • My family
    I am doing this for them!  To give them something to aspire to and, as I said earlier, to benefit the family as a whole.
  • Myself!
    I want to study for my own piece of mind and to develop my self-confidence and self-esteem. I am constantly telling myself that I can do it, that I am able to do it and that I will succeed!
  • My friends
    My friends are a wealth of motivation with their: ‘you go girl’s and their ‘you can do it’s!
  • My peers
    My fellow students have provided me with massive doses of reassurance and support as we have travelled together down our separate study paths.
  • Release of results
    I find that regular boosts of motivation also come when my assignment and exam marks come back. Yippee!

welcome to motivation

As for those chores around the house… mid-semester breaks, mid-year break and end of year breaks sort all that out! It usually only takes a couple of days and I can see the floor at home again. A few days more and I can actually see over the ironing pile, and after only one day spent in the garden, I no longer have to fear my children may be eaten alive by possible tigers, hyenas and lions roaming in the wilderness otherwise known as my backyard. The semester breaks are also great for catching up with friends over a long hot coffee (love that coffee), shopping trips (any excuse really) and long lunches (we usually have so much to say). Uni breaks are also great for family catch-ups as well, although I find that with very careful time management I really don’t miss out on anything throughout the semester; it is all a matter of planning. Just sort out the important dates and activities and study around them!

So if there is any ‘self-doubt or guilt hurdles’ in your study plans, remember why you are doing it or why you want to do it. It is either for you or your family or both, and let me tell you from experience, they are both so worth it!

-Lisa

You vs. Your BFFL. Dealing with peer competition: how to maintain friendships when competing for jobs or grades.

Ever since we were little, we’ve been taught that we’re all in competition with each other. In primary school we were given awards for the best macaroni necklace and in high school biology we learned about survival of the fittest.

So naturally, we’re inclined to become jealous of one another if we feel that they’re in the way of what we want.

This is ESPECIALLY not cool if the person in your way is your mate.

The great thing about going to university is that you get to hang out with like-minded people who are working towards the same or similar goals as you. However, this also means you’ll probably be competing against them to get a high grade or, eventually, a job.

Now I know what you’re thinking:

‘Eliza,’ you’re saying. ‘You’re so self-confident and well adjusted, you’d never get jealous of your mates… would you?’

Well guys, this will come as a massive shock to you, but I too have, from time to time, become jealous of my uni mates.

For what it's worth, we're all crazy

No matter what you’re studying, you’re probably going to go through an assignment situation where you have to compete for roles: project manager, group leader etc… In the media program, we have to compete against each other for our desired role when making films.

While this is a fantastic exercise because it’s how job selection usually happens in ‘the real world’, it’s also pretty awful. In the media program, every student has to stand up in front of the class and explain why they’re better than their friends at performing a particular role.

Ouch.

After going through this a few times during my degree, I’ve developed a couple of ways to deal with competing against my mates.

First of all, try to keep the competition as professional as possible.

job-competition
Remember that your friend is probably feeling just as uncomfortable competing against you as you are competing against them. Try to leave the competing in the classroom or interview room; once you’re outside the situation, try to focus on more positive aspects of your friendship. Also, avoid making personal attacks about your mate and focus more on how well you can do the job.

Keep in mind that if your friend gets the job you wanted, you will have gained an awesome contact in your desired industry, which could come in handy in the future.

The second thing to remember is that you are unique. You are one of a kind and you have different talents and skills to your friends.

you are unique - use this to your advantageGoing back to our high school ‘survival of the fittest’ lessons, we were taught that animals are in constant competition in order to uh… avoid ‘going to the farm’. However, another survival tactic animals have is to adapt and find their niche in order to contribute to the world order in their own special way. You can do this too! You just need to find out what you’re special talent is and how you can contribute to the working world order.
A good way to find out where your talents lie are in your grades; while your mate might get distinctions in the communication subjects, you might be better at research and therefore do better in analysis subjects. This could lead to a career in research. Sometimes our talents surprise us, and if this is the case, you might not be sure how they will help your career.

I’m really bad at most sports and I’m not very academic (seriously, if someone can explain long division to me I’ll give you my first-born), BUT I can talk under wet cement and I love questioning everything. While my skills weren’t appreciated too much at school, once I started studying media and journalism at uni I WAS IN MY ELEMENT.
This was because I had found my niche, my groove.

Once you’ve found your groove you can use this as a selling point when you have to compete against your friends. When you’re in an interview or doing an assignment, focus on your unique skills instead of comparing yourself to your friends.

Competition is a fact of life, but when it comes to competing with your friends try not to take it personally. Remember that you’re all just trying to survive in this sometimes brutal world and in the end your mates will be there to support you and help you out when possible.

To quote that one girl from Mean Girls, ‘I wish I could bake a cake filled with rainbows and smiles and we could all eat a piece and be happy’.

But that’s not how the world works unfortunately, so just focus on why you’re awesome and you’ll find that trying to get a job or a good grade won’t be as painful as Year 11 biology class.