My top career tips

Whether you’ve just enrolled in your degree program or will graduate at the end of this semester, competition for your desired job will likely be high.  With that in mind, it’s a good idea to start planning now to snag that dream role. Here are my top tips to give you the edge that you’ll need to blast your way into a successful career:

Cultivate your online profile

You’ve probably heard a million times what not to do online (i.e. don’t make your crazy party photos public!) but it’s time you also heard what you should be doing.  Create a profile on LinkedIn or another professional career site that’s popular for your industry and country (yes, it does differ greatly).  Start a blog, or get tweeting about industry-related topics.  As a student, you might not think you have a lot to contribute, but I reckon you do.  It could be as simple as a blog reflecting on your growth following professional experience – this will help potential employers get to know you before you even meet.

social-media-logos online profiles

Develop professional networks

You’re probably familiar with the term ‘it’s who you know’ and it couldn’t be more true! Other people can be an excellent source of information on job opportunities, inside industry knowledge and personal development opportunities.  So put yourself out there and meet those already working in the industry you wish to enter.  Admittedly, this is something that I find rather difficult, but attending networking events or relevant industry talks is a great way to begin building your all-important professional network.

Set your goals

I’ve previously blogged about the importance of setting goals: they are your key to keeping motivated and making your vision become reality!

Three take-out coffee. Two cups in holder.

Get experience

Experience can help you decide if your chosen career really is right for you and, if so, help you narrow down the specific role that is of most interest to you.  It will also give you that edge when looking for full-time work after graduation, as your commitment and capabilities will be more of a known quantity.  If paid experience is difficult to find, consider volunteering.  There are many charitable organisations out there that could really benefit from your skills and it will look fabulous on your resume!

Have a CV and cover letter ready to go

Speaking of resumes, it’s good to have a generic one up-to-date to avoid the stress of putting one together from scratch at the last minute.  If your dream job became a possibility tomorrow, wouldn’t you want to submit your application right away?!

Be open for learning any time

Don’t think that the only time you can learn valuable stuff at uni is in your lecture or tutorial.  Rich possibilities exist in all sorts of places.  Perhaps it’s the manager that you got chatting to at a networking event or the long-term company secretary you met at your mate’s BBQ – each person can provide you with different pieces of the puzzle!

 Networking puzzle piece - the people you meet

Touchdown in the comfort zone

“Sometimes it’s good to step outside your comfort zone.”

It’s that broken record you’ve heard your entire life, from parents, friends, teachers, and just about anyone you’ve ever spoken to. This begs the question: what actually is ‘the comfort zone?’

get outside your comfort zone

Given my background in debating, I thought I’d break down each word:

Comfort – Recliners
Going furniture shopping with my parents used to be an arduous task, until I realised I was in a room full of beds and lounges ready to be tested.

Zone – The in-zone
I don’t watch a whole lot of grid iron, but I do know that to score points you have to throw the ball to a player who runs the ball over the end of the pitch and into the in-zone!

Somehow, I don’t think the people who are always talking about getting out their comfort zone were referring to a sofa on a football pitch, so I took another approach to try and understand this directive… examples of people leaving their comfort zones.

Weirdly, the first thing that comes to mind is the movie She’s The Man. Amanda Bynes wants to play soccer with the boys team at college, so she pretends to be a boy. While the practical legitimacy of this movie can be questioned, it does prove that the protagonist went the extra mile to achieve her dreams.

She's the Man - out of comfort zone

So, how does this apply to university life? Whether you are fresh out of school, back from holidays or just needed a change, university is the chance to reinvent yourself. I’m not saying dress up as a man/woman, but you will find so many people with similar personalities and interests who you can connect with, even as an online student. There’s Harry Potter clubs, sport teams, chocolate appreciation societies, Dungeons and Dragons, and so much more, so get out and do something!

If you are attending university next year and are looking for a way to step out of your comfort zone, I would recommend going to a toga party. There is definitely nothing more uncomfortable than wearing a bed sheet around people you have only just met, but I bet you won’t regret it!

no toga no party - college toga partiesUntil next time,
Tom

Studying with technology

I didn’t grow up with technology. As I have grown older, especially since I started studying at uni, it has been thrust upon me. I grew up in a generation where the most exciting technological innovation was colour television (1975), after having spent most of my childhood watching cartoons in black and white. I know it doesn’t sound that exciting in today’s terms, but you have to understand that, at the time, colour TV was cutting-edge stuff.

original computer

So, you must appreciate that trying to understand the digital world that we now all live in can be a little bit of struggle for me at times, although I do try my hardest. I have a confession to make. Before I started writing these blogs, I didn’t even know what a blog was and had to ask. Oh, I had a very basic understanding of computers, but I do mean very basic. I used emails and I was familiar with what a keyboard was but, unfortunately, that was the limit of my knowledge. I was not a complete fool because I was enlightened with regards to the any key.

press any key

At this point in my life, I would definitely consider myself a pre-tech geek. But when I started at uni, I had to learn… and fast! I started off with a copy of Office and sat down day after day in the weeks prior to starting uni trying to figure it all out. ‘I am going to be on top of this technology thing’, I thought. I clicked on this button and that button and even tried screaming at my computer, but I soon realised that the screaming didn’t help. It was frustrating, aggravating and somehow exhilarating, especially when I finally understood something!

When I attended my first week, I realised that simply being able to write an assignment in Word was not enough at uni. They were talking about PowerPoints, Excel, Access, Publisher, MathType, Endnote and wikis. This was a foreign language. I started to wonder whether I had gone to sleep and had woken up in another country. I had serious doubts in the first semester that I would ever get it.

googleit

By the end of Semester One, I had managed to struggle through and, to my great surprise, even did pretty well in my Excel and Access assignments. But Semester Two was just around the corner. Well, it started off again like a broken record (that’s the original MP3 or iPod, for those of you that have never heard of a record): peer reviews, statistics, more PowerPoints and Turnitin. And yet, again, to my great surprise, I made it out the other end of another semester completely unscathed, apart from the occasional caffeine overload.

Now, here I am at the end of my second year with all of the tech frustration behind me… almost! I still forget to save my assignments occasionally as I am writing them and hit the delete key without meaning to. But I now know how to find them hiding on my computer and have just recently set my computer to auto save… I wish someone had told me this was possible two years ago. PowerPoints, Turnitin, blogs, wikis, publisher, MathType, peer reviews, social media, skype and studying online… easy! It all seems so easy now.  I no longer hit the panic button, reach for a strong coffee, go into denial or wish there was another, much more tech-savvy version of me when things go wrong. I now have the answer… Google it!

coping mechanisms

Learning about technology when you didn’t grow up with it can be difficult, but it is possible. In my spare time, apart from the standard boring hobbies that people of my era have, I do enjoy playing computer games. I still don’t understand many of the technologies that are about today and I still don’t have an iPhone, but I now consider myself well on the way to being a full-blown tech geek. Here is a bit of computer humour that I can now understand:

  • Some things man was never meant to know, for everything else there is Google.
  • Failure is not an option – it comes bundled with Windows.
  • You know you’re a geek when you try to shoo a fly away from the monitor with your cursor.

If you didn’t grow up with technology either, I’d love to hear about  your experiences learning how to use tech at uni.

Handy Group Assignment Tips

group assignment hangover referenceWe’ve all been here, haven’t we? The massive group assignment that nobody really wants to take a part in, but we have to because, well… we need to pass the subject! We all know those feels. It’s difficult to trust another person with a particular section or part of the assignment because we just don’t trust that they will do it, or do a good job.

But, I think there are a number of ways to help the group assignment process go more smoothly. I recently completed a 50% group assignment where we had to give a 45-minute presentation to our peers and I think there were a number of things that helped this assignment go relatively well.

To begin with, we’ve all been friends for a number of semesters now, which made things incredibly easy. We already have each other on Facebook, so organising get-togethers wasn’t difficult at all. We all knew each other’s personalities, strengths and weaknesses. If you’re able, I definitely recommend trying to create an assignment group with people you know and, better yet, people you are friends with!

This way, people normally feel relatively guilty if they social loaf, or turn up late to group meetings or don’t do their assigned part of the paper as well as they could. And, of course, it’s easy to tell them that they’re slacking off too (in the nicest way possible of course!).

Try to organise things early. Just like with every assignment, if you leave it to the last minute, it’s going to be difficult, especially with a number of people trying to organise its completion.  For my latest group assignment, we had it completed two weeks before the presentation date, so we had plenty of time to practice our presentation beforehand.

Try and make as many group get-togethers as possible. Texting, phone calls, emails and Facebook messages can only go so far when there are more than 2 of you. And this way, you can really figure out how far the others have gone with their allocated section, as well as brainstorming how to fit each section into the final assignment.

Try to have fun. I know… that sounds crazy, huh? I always try to at least enjoy one part of the assignment if I can. Whether it’s writing the actual paper (on something I really enjoy), or doing a fabulous job of researching, or even that great feeling of presenting on the day and absolutely nailing it! I find I normally get a decent mark on the assignments I enjoy and although that’s obviously not always possible, we can at least try, can’t we?

Having fun in group assignments can be as easy as having a chilled break in the middle of a get-together, going to get a coffee or chatting with your group members about things other than the assignment. This will build team rapport, and make the group assignment just that little bit easier.

I hope these group assignment tips have been useful, and will help you brainstorm some new ways to smash out a group assignment next time you have one!

Long-term goals: The lowdown

We all have hopes and dreams and things we’d like to achieve today, tomorrow and in the future.  But if asked what your specific goals are, would you be able to express them clearly?  Would they reflect what you truly want?  If you’re anything like me, you might think you can answer ‘yes’ to such questions, but later on realise that the ideas are merely inside your own head and are somewhat muddled.  That’s fine, but if you’d really like to reach those goals and take the best path on the way to achieving them, it’s a good idea to get some clarity.  The long-term goals you set now will impact what you do today and give you a sense of purpose and motivation to make your vision a reality in the future.  A bit of last-minute cramming will not suffice I’m afraid, so with the following tips I hope to help you take those scary first steps!

wide open road goal setting

Get personal

The first thing to remember is that your goals are personal and need to reflect what you truly want.  So what if they’re different to those of your best mate or everyone else studying your course.  You are an individual and the targets you set yourself need to reflect this – that’s why they will motivate you.  So take some time to really think about what you value, what you enjoy and where your skills are.  These insights can then be translated into your long-term goals, which can relate to your career, family, finances or health.  Envision what you want to be doing, where and how you will be doing it, and with whom.

career path road signs

Break it down

Now that you’ve got your long-term goals clearly defined, it’s time to figure out what you’ll need to do to achieve them.  This step isn’t about noting what you will do at precisely what time on each day, but rather a general overview of the type of activities and learning that you might need to involve yourself in to ensure that you move in the desired direction.  It might be that you need to upskill, or it could be that you could benefit from some industry-specific experience or even the building of relevant networks.  These will become your short term goals which will help measure your achievement towards your long-term goals and prevent you from feeling overwhelmed.  Whatever they are, they need to line up with your current experiences, capabilities and personal goals so what you need to do might be different to what Joe Bloggs needs to do, even if you share the same long-term goal.

Be realistic

Now that you’ve got some goals in mind, really sit down and think about their achievability.  Remember, with long-term goals, you should be looking about 5 to 10 years into the future.  So be realistic –  If it’s achievable, great; if it isn’t, revise!

Get specific

Don’t let all your hard work fade away like a New Year’s resolution.  Write your goals down and add some dates so you have a deadline in place.  Then go and share your goals with someone you trust.  These little steps will increase your commitment and make your achievement of the goals more likely.

Why social workers need to be flexible

Be flexible

So you’ve set your long-term goals and everything doesn’t go as planned.  Don’t worry – that’s pretty normal.  Your task now is to go back to the planning stage and think about how this affects the achievability of your goals.  If they need adjusting, do it!  None of us know exactly what the future holds, so it’s important to be flexible and roll with the changes.  It could be that a new pathway to your goals opens up and it will get you there quicker or perhaps the journey will be richer.  Some changes are great and you need to be open and flexible so that you don’t miss out on such opportunities!

Setting long-term goals isn’t easy but certainly is worthwhile.  There’s no time like the present, so grab a coffee and get started!

go out there and be amazing

Why my degree was right for me

Once upon a time, when I was a wee lad, a huge storm broke over the horizon. Gusts of wind picked up and threw everything around in its path, including our family trampoline. We woke the next day to discover our trampoline had landed on the roof of a neighbouring house across the road. Some years later, that same neighbour greeted me on my first day at university as a lecturer.

Tom's trampoline after stormLooking back, that was probably just coincidence and not really fate. However, there were some key indicators over the years that reminded me I was studying the right degree for me. One of these was the style of learning. At school, I really struggled with maths because I couldn’t apply myself practically. Had Applied Media been a textbook-based course, I don’t know that I would have made it through. Luckily, my course was much more like physical education than maths, meaning you couldn’t really be marked on anything you couldn’t physically create. It is always different for everyone, but this was a huge plus for me.

One thing I never did at school was hand in an assignment early. Maybe it was the thrill of pushing the limits of deadlines, maybe it was just laziness. Something must have clicked at university, because I handed my first assignment in one week early. This unprecedented event was rewarded with a 7 (High Distinction) and an enlarged ego. I was so excited about handing in assignments I seemed to forget… I WAS EXCITED ABOUT HANDING IN ASSIGNMENTS! Who had I become? Was this maturity or had I been brainwashed? It couldn’t just be because I enjoyed the work I was doing, could it…?

If you’re anything like me, the first time you went to Dreamworld you refused to leave the gates at 5pm. I’m not going to lie, that’s exactly how I felt at the end of my degree. Not to say knowing I’d never have to hand in an assignment again wasn’t a great feeling, but I was left with an empty void. Having spent three years at USQ, I felt like I was leaving a massive part of myself behind on graduation day. The first thing I did after I graduated was search for post-graduate degrees and similar courses I could study just so I could stay.

But it wouldn’t have been the same. Much like watching the Lord of the Rings trilogy, you can try and recreate the magic of the first time you saw the films on the big screen, but it will never be the same. Frodo didn’t get to the top of Mount Doom and say ‘let’s do that again.’ Instead, he got on a boat with Gandalf and began a new adventure, cherishing the memory of his nine-hour, multi-million dollar, blockbuster quest.

End of LOTR trilogySo, I figure, if you cherish the memory of your university experience so much so that you consider going back just so you can relive it, you chose the right degree for you.

Until next time,
Tom.

The light at the end of the tunnel: study holiday planning

Well, we are halfway through semester already, but there is still hope for us… because holidays are close! I suspect that I am not alone in secretly saying to myself ‘Yippee it’s nearly holidays’. But it does leave me asking ‘Where did the semester go?’ If you are anything like me at the moment it all seems like study, study, study! Assignments… when will they end? And it would be so easy to think that with the mid-semester holidays coming soon I could just do nothing, have a complete break and forget all the assignments that are backed up halfway to Woolloomooloo.

holding booksBut I know that I would regret it at the end of semester when I go back to lectures and remember that those assignments are still due and aarrrrghhh! I haven’t started yet.

So holidays are an ideal opportunity to catch up on all the readings that you are behind in and get ahead on the assignments that are due before we get into the exam period. I find that a combination of relaxation, study and assignments works best for me during the mid-semester break. That way, when the last few weeks of the semester come around the stress levels are kept to a bare minimum. Well, that’s the theory anyway. It does work…mostly. Here are some options for studying during the mid-semester break:

  • Catch up on study and assignments one day, then take the next day off and catch up with friends.
  • Go crazy and work like there is no tomorrow, get everything done and dusted in the first week and take the rest of the holiday break off! The best thing about this plan is that when you get back to uni you feel like you have had a break and all your catch up is done.
  • Have a complete rest in the first week, do nothing, sit around, go to the beach, whatever you desire, then get into study in the last week of the holidays… but be warned! This plan does have a drawback! After a week of doing nothing it is really hard to get back into it and get motivated to actually start studying and begin those assignments again.
  • Do the mornings! Study in the mornings and have YOUR time in the afternoons.
  • Do the afternoons! Have YOUR time in the mornings and study in the afternoons.
  • If you are an evening person, have YOUR time during the day and study/ assignments in the wee hours of the evening.
  • If you are planning on going away for the holidays, take your laptop and assignment or study work. You never know, there may be a few moments that you will be totally inspired and a whole assignment can be completed in a few hours! Personally, this strategy never worked for me because I have always found the beach/family/shopping too alluring to resist!

But regardless of how you go about studying during the holidays, that is, if you do any studying at all, just remember that the holidays are a great opportunity to catch up and get ahead with your studies. Any effort you do manage to put into study will just make life after holidays and before exams so much less stressful. And remember: distraction is the enemy of study!

distraction

Travel survival guide: Your map to enjoying the semester break!

We are almost halfway through semester, which means that the midyear break is fast approaching.  If you want something to look forward to once the hard slog is on hold, start planning your travels now!

Whether it’s a weekend away somewhere nearby or an overseas jaunt, these travel tips will help make sure that you’re prepared for the rest and relaxation or chaos and adrenaline-fuelled adventures you are dreaming of.

1.     Do your research (even if you like surprises)

When going somewhere new, it’s always a good idea to find out a little something before you go to ensure you stay safe and healthy and, for those who don’t like surprises, have a few ideas of what to see and do.  As a minimum, check to see if there are any health or safety risks if you plan to travel overseas – and take action now to prevent them.  You might also want to check that there aren’t any major events happening during your planned stay. If you’re like me and prefer not to pre-book, this makes it rather difficult to find a place to stay on arrival. Trust me, I’ve been caught out more than once!  It’s kind of like approaching an assignment – while it is possible to wing it, you’re more likely to do well if you know the basics before you get started!

packing essentials

2.     Pack light (but have something for all types of weather)

There’s nothing worse than lugging a heavy backpack or suitcase on vacation, only to realise that you don’t use half the stuff you brought with you and need other things, which you left behind. Do you really need 4 pairs of high heels if you’re going to the beach for the weekend? Probably not, but make sure you pack one pair just in case you decide to go out somewhere more formal for dinner or dancing. And make sure you bring something warm – when the weather gets bad, even the seaside can become freezing in summer!  And don’t forget a pair of jeans: you can dress them up or down depending on your shoes, top and accessories. It’s kind of like preparing for an exam. You can’t prepare for absolutely everything, but by ensuring you have a broad understanding and focusing on core concepts, you are more likely to succeed.

rainy day

3.     Expect the unexpected (and hope that they’re only positive)

We all know how good it feels to finally be on vacation after a seemingly never-ending semester. You’re no longer on a deadline… you feel on top of the world! Nothing can get in the way of a great vacation… but just in case, make sure you take out travel health insurance, particularly if you’re heading overseas. In some countries, you won’t be treated unless you can prove that you have the money to pay beforehand and it can be very, very expensive. It’s like that last-minute cramming you do before you walk into the exam room – you might not need it but you will be so thankful you put the extra effort in to swot if you do.

4.     Go with the flow (unless of course it’s free flow all night!)

So you get to the airport and find that your flight has been delayed, or you check the forecast and that bright, sunny beach you were dreaming of is currently being pummelled with rain. Fret not, for vacations aren’t the time for precise plans anyway. Chances are that there’s some great free stuff to check out at the airport (movies, gardens, even slides for adults!) and reading a book from the dry sanctuary of your beach bungalow is still a more relaxing and tranquil experience than you would have if you were at home. Think of it like tackling the ups and downs of uni. You might not always take the path you had planned or get the grade that you strived for, but you gain that all-important knowledge and understanding in the end.. and it is this that sets you free!

keep calm and plan your holiday

I wish you all a triumphant march to the end of semester.  Study hard, but don’t forget to take a break and plan a rewarding vacation to look forward to!

How being proud of your uni can pay off

It brings me great pride to say, as a USQ student and a USQ student ambassador, that the Springfield campus Open Day was a huge success! It was raining for the days leading up to the event and many of us were worried mother nature would rain on our parade (pun very much intended), but she didn’t! Of course, she was not incredibly nice, and decided to make it quite windy on the day instead… but that was nothing we couldn’t live with.

The Open Day included all sorts of useful information for prospective students, including faculty and general information sessions, individual talks to academics, campus tours and the opportunity to talk to current students. Of course, not all of the day was centred around information and  fun activities were also available, such as free fairy floss, giant jenga, a caricature artist and zorb balls, just to name a few!

open day Caricaturist

It was great to have the opportunity to talk to a number of grade 12 students who are quite nervous about their upcoming QCS test as well as life after high school. I talked to one student in particular who was 100% sure she was coming to USQ next year. We talked about what uni life is like for a little bit, how she feels about the upcoming QCS test and how nervous she feels about leaving school. As she left, she said, ‘see you next year’, which gave me a fantastic warm squishy feeling inside!

Of course, many of the prospective students who turned up on the day only knew about it because of our fantastic student ambassador team, which I am proudly a part of. We regularly go to expos and schools to talk to a range of people from the public about why tertiary education and USQ can be the right choice for them! This is a picture of a few student ambassadors doing their thing at Open Day! You’ve probably seen a few of us around campus without even realising it!

Open Day Ambassadors

Personally, my favourite story from Open Day is about a grade 12 student from Livingstone Christian College, which I visited in the week leading up to Open Day to do a scholarship presentation. Even though it took this one student 2 hours to get to our campus, using both a bus and a train, he promised me he would come, and he did.

Open Day behind the scenes

He was one of the first people on campus on the day, and also one of the last to leave. While on campus, he spent most of his time in the mock TV studio our Bachelor of Applied Media students had set up, even going on camera and being interviewed by one of the Bachelor of Applied Media students and fellow student ambassador, Eliza. Eliza even used that interview to write an article about him in The Queensland Times. All up, it was the perfect day for the student to get involved in university life and see what being a creative arts student at USQ could mean!

Open Day behind the scenes

At the end of the day, this student said he was going to change his QTAC preferences to include USQ because of the close ties that USQ’s creative arts faculty has with a number of top-class theatre companies!

Knowing that I was able to contribute to creating a positive experience of uni life for this student, and that this could help shape his future in ways he never even thought of before, gives me a great sense of pride in myself and in my uni.

Top 4 deadly spots to hang out in Toowoomba with the USQ Mob!

Welcome to USQ! You’re probably wondering where to hang-out with the Mob now that you’re a student. That’s where I come in! Read on for 4 deadly spots for having a yarn and finding your place at USQ!

  1. The Common Room

CAIS Common RoomThe Common Room can be found in the College of Australian Indigenous Studies, in TA Block.  This is the where the USQ Mob hang out to enjoy endless cups of coffee and yarns with their new study friends.  The Common Room is a great place to kick back before class, read up on your class notes or catch up with your sisters and brothers. You might even be lucky enough to see the Aunts and Uncle who sometimes come on-campus. It’s a great place to share stories, designs and dreams. We all come from different areas, but in The Common Room we are all the same, working for the same dream. Even if it is just to proofread an assignment or work out how to reference an article, there is always someone there to help over a cuppa and yarn.

  1. The Hub

USQ Hub ToowoombaSoak up uni life in the R Block Hub. Not only can you grab a quick bite at the café and Refectory, you can also just lounge about on the funky chairs watching the fish swim by. Everyone meets at The Hub before and after classes to catch-up and head off to classes together. As the semester progresses and assignments start rolling in, the library is just an elevator ride away from The Hub, where you can get your study on.

Need to charge your phone? No worries! Take advantage of the power points, computers and printers at The Hub while you sip away on a hot coffee and snack on a toasted ham, cheese and tomato sandwich. The Division of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Services is also on hand to help out with tech issues you may have!

  1. The Gumbi Gumbi Gardens

This place is just too deadly, and is a great place to chill out and have a good yarn. The Gumbi Gumbi Gardens are just along the main entrance to USQ and on tough study days it’s an awesome place to get back to nature.

If you haven’t already, get to your iTunes or Play Store and download the Gumbi Gumbi Gardens Audio Tour.  It will help you to appreciate the things around you and allow you to enjoy a well-deserved study break.

As a mother, I like bringing my children to have a walk through the Gardens to discover the different hidden plants and totems throughout the gardens. It’s awesome to see my children run about and play in the Gardens while I catch up on study, or revise my lecture notes.

Gumbi Gumbi gardens Gumbi Gumbi gardensGumbi Gumbi gardens

As you can see from these photos, my family love the gardens! They enjoy the open space, the plants and rolling down the hills). It’s great to share their Aboriginal culture and sometimes we are lucky enough to have James Stumer from CAIS (College for Aboriginal Indigenous Studies) come along to share Indigenous knowledge with us!

  1. Murri Meet-Up

Murri Meet Up Group Donella and TylerNeed study advice or just want to have a chat about university life? Murri Meet-Up is a deadly opportunity to get tips and tricks to succeed in your studies. Best of all, it’s available on-campus or online. So if you aren’t close by, you have access to the Mob, no matter where you are!

This hangout spot is especially great when it gets close to assignment and exam time. The Murri Meet-Up leader is a student who has been there before and will be able to step you through.  When you first get to uni, I recommend enrolling yourself in Murri-Meet up, not just to get the most out of your studies, but also to find your place in the USQ Mob.

Catching up with the USQ Mob is one of my favourite study experiences and these 4 places allow me to take a break, learn from my brothers and sisters and enjoy my time at USQ.

So where will you hangout?